How ‘community projects’ can help with unemployment – 43 shining examples

South Africa’s unemployment rate is currently sitting at an average of just over 25%¹, peaking at over 27% at the end of 2016. While that figure decreased at the start of 2017, the fact remains that a quarter of South Africa’s citizens remain jobless. We are at a critical time in our economy where food prices continue to rise and jobs are scarce. Can community projects possibly help both of these needs?

GOOD NEWS: Prof Elain Vlok, Founder of Clover Mama Afrika.

I think they can, albeit on a small scale. Based purely on the success of the ‘mamas’ under the Clover Mama Afrika wing, we have witnessed the positive impact of community projects. I started Clover Mama Afrika in 2004, with a passion to implement change and set up a Corporate Social Investment initiative that both Clover and I could be proud of. During the last thirteen years, I’ve watched as our efforts to help communities have developed into successful small businesses, creating jobs and sustaining communities at the same time.

To date, we’ve appointed 43 women as part of the project – we call them ‘mamas’ due to the nurturing role they fill in their communities. These mamas serve as examples of how community projects can both support a community and provide employment opportunities.

Take Mama Selestien Moses for example. She became a Clover Mama in April 2007. Mama Sella runs the Khayalethu Care Centre in Ashbury in the Western Cape. As part of our commitment to her, Clover Mama Afrika provided her with the skills, equipment and training that she needed to further develop her community project. She’s since grown her centre’s capacity, caring for more than 300 children and over 80 elderly. She now supports her community with a variety of additional skills, from bread baking, catering and flower arranging to sewing. Mama Sella currently employs 17 people and has transferred skills to over 400 others in her community.

For the full article: SA Good News